Neutron Stars are some of the strangest things in the Universe. Not quite massive enough to become black holes they are basically atoms as big as mountains with properties so extreme it's mind-blowing. And if you get too close to a neutron star you are in big trouble… Lots of you told us youtube doesn't tell you when we release new content. So we made a newsletter. No spam ever: (Never miss a new video again) The music of the video can be found here: & Videos, explaining things. Like evolution, time, space, global energy or our existence in this strange universe. We are a team of designers, journalists and musicians who want to make science look beautiful. Because it is beautiful. Visit us on our Website, Twitter, Facebook, Patreon or Behance to say hi! THANKS A LOT TO OUR PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Justin Degenaars Opal Hartbower jordan gardner Derek Loa Chris Kitching Jeff Le Devir Islas Andrew Connor Francesca Monteiro Scott Zell Jeroen Koerts Tanya Smirnova Patrick Eyrich J.J. Chris Linardos Tony Morley Ben Nunan Moe Levin Pholpat Durongbhan Raphael Caroline Andrewes Alex Kaplan KokLiang Lim Thomas Borg trefmanic Mathias Westad Larssen Katia Lira Adam Smith Dean Herbert Giovanna Cardoso Adam Primaeros Rory Bennett Gaëtan Duvaux Rasmus Lind Ghitea Andrei Paul Larry Bunyard Maximilian Heitsch Sebastian Laiseca Ata Celbis Andrzej Rejman Benjamin Fries Alexander Heavens Chris Doughty Dario Pagnia Sara Shah Eduardo Barbosa Maximilian Ritter Yousif Jesse Powell Peter Wagner Eliud Vasquez Igor Benicio de Mesquita Siddharth Bajaj Greeny Liu Tibor Schiemann dante harper Bünyamin Tetik Joe Pond Stephen Morse Jørgen Smalås Evan Low Dario „TLO“ Wünsch Matthew Macomber Ziggy Freed Chase Gotlieb Brian David Henderson Alejandro Liechty David Davenport-Firth Janne Jaukkuri Michael Ren Peter Schuller tBinger Brandy Alexander Alexander Kosenkov Scott Laing Gizem Gürkan George Chearswat oscar gautama Pascal B. Brandon Liu Tim Justin T. Daniel O.C.L. Leigh Thompson Heemi Kutia Valerie Brunet somersault18:24 Jan Lukas Lehmann Javier de la Garza Peter Žnuderl Randy Knapp Benoît Graham Jeff Churchill Jonathan Velazquez Gore Daniel Roman Zolotorevich Pol Lutgen Seona Tea Daniel Fuchs Thomas Lee Finn Edwards Petr Pilař Balazs-Hegedus Jozsef Fabricio Godoy Charles Kuang Atoms As Big As Mountains – Neutron Stars Explained Help us caption & translate this video!


View full lesson: It’s obvious that knowing more than one language can make certain things easier — like traveling or watching movies without subtitles. But are there other advantages to having a bilingual (or multilingual) brain? Mia Nacamulli details the three types of bilingual brains and shows how knowing more than one language keeps your brain healthy, complex and actively engaged. Lesson by Mia Nacamulli, animation by TED-Ed.


View full lesson: In the United States, it’s estimated that 30 percent of adults and 66 percent of adolescents are regularly sleep-deprived. This isn’t just a minor inconvenience: staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. Claudia Aguirre shows what happens to your body and brain when you skip sleep. Lesson by Claudia Aguirre, animation by TED-Ed.


Where are all the aliens? The universe is too big and too old, why have we not met aliens yet? Do they live in computers? Were they wiped out by an ancient super intelligence? Or are we just to primitive to understand their motives? Whatever the answer is, it is incredibly important for our own future. First Fermi Video: What is life: Videos, explaining things. Like evolution, time, space, global energy or our existence in this strange universe. We are a team of designers, journalists and musicians who want to make science look beautiful. Because it is beautiful. You can get the MUSIC for the video here: Listen: Buy: More: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Tony Morley, Stephen Bassett, Nicholas Hill, Ben Nunan, Atlantis, Andrzej Rejman, Sam Elitzer, Mehmet Cihan Yalcin, Matthew Datcher, Ben Archie, Sara Sara, AgentK, Alex Hercules, John McCulloch, John Green, Carly Tawse, Sean Berg, [ K A I ] = 石 : :, Conor Morgan, Matt G, Christian Clifton, Jacob Fry, Jeff Le, Joji Wata, Raphael Hviding, Chris Simpson, Kinan Jarjous, Dominick Holguin, Ngo Vo Hoang Viet, Jac Kee, John Teabo, Jekotia, Wouter ten Bosch, NuTTyX, Taylor Hadden, Francesca Monteiro, Joseph McKnight, Arnas, Duncan Cheong, Derek, Juan Manuel Corredor, Jackie, Scott Zell, James Craver, Nicholas Buckendorf, Broderick, Maarten Bremer, Nat Thomas Golder, Alex Kaplan, Patrick Eyrich, Damian Johnson, Chris Linardos, Jelle Luteijn, Jónatan Nilsson, Kirstie, Jesse Taylor, tekbit, MrProffesser, Richard Reynolds, Jeroen Koerts, Otakode, Cody, Michal, Bruce Fong, Caroline Andrewes, Rachel Proctor, Jan A, Sam Pottinger, Presley Reed, Marek Číž, KokLiang Lim, Tom Alexander Kutil, Dean Herbert, Daniel Tamai Gabriel, Okan, Sasha C, Marcelo, trefmanic, Adam Smith, Anton Efimenko, Gaëtan Duvaux, Lukas Grossar, Alexander Ahn, Brian Fryer, Vedran Bajic, Daniel Jones, Larry Bunyard, Susan Love, maarten ligtenberg, Shawn Wilson, Ryan, Gregg Hilferding, Ann, Frank Bijkersma, Harry Brisson, Chris Wills, Zac Delwiche, Stian Bluth Levik, Sebastian Laiseca, Alexandre C, Chase, Justin Bull, George Strakhov, Aharon Snyder, Volodymyr Khomenko, Nhan Nguyen Brian, Alexander Heavens, Pamela T., Arbel Zhao, Melissa Page, Artur Caminero Gomes Soares, Ivin spates, Miranda Willan, Adam Primaeros, Adam Dunlap, Marius Apalseth, Daniel Carrera, Michael Slade, Wilhelm So, Ryan DiSanto, Cerlinfia Chen, Mark Govea, Sara Shah, Andrew Knudson, Radek Falhar, Jan Schmid, Aaron, Nak, Ghitea Andrei Paul, Matthew Russell, Todd Gross, Veselin Kostadinov, Zach Meador, Luca Friedrich, David Torres, Paul Strauss, M4tc4t, Jacob Schirm, David Phong, Per Markus Edvardsen, Wilker, Sébastien Blanchet, William Parker, Hata'ab, Cid, Maggie Chok, Diego Nakama, Lennart Rosam, Colin Palin, Nate Rice, Soares, Benoit Pette, Alexander Brazie, Casey Mazzarella, Doug Wollison, JAMES RUDNET, Brett Cowie, Alto Ono, John Gietzen, Avi Yashchin, Ivan Zukov, Dave Neu, Matthew Willhite, JiaJunQiu, John, Simon Younan, Danilo Caires, Kyle Andrew Waldron, Adriano Collalti, Bret Brizzee, Fernando Henrique, Joshua Grose, Alexander, Roy Ston, Koen Driessen, Marcel Graumüller, Dany Ehrenbrink, Erik Brizzee, Peter Dexter, Andreas Kollmann, Torin Rettig, Jeffrey Cope, Weston, Tersol, Chris Thompson, Samuel Matchain, Valentin, Alejandro Medrano Gil, Philip Fermi Paradox II – Solutions and Ideas Help us caption & translate this video!


Use the URL: for 10% with a new website and support this channel. Also make your life easier. Thanks a lot to Squarespace for supporting the show! So. Space elevators. Are they are thing that we should talk about? Support us on Patreon so we can make more stuff (and get cool wallpapers and stuff): Kurzgesagt merch here: Get the music of the video here: Soundcloud: Bandcamp: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Margaret A. Romoser, Peter Poier, Lorenz Spenger, Trivikram Kamat, Jens-Christian Huus, darkskuld, Pidgeon Pie is a Lie, Mallory Connors, Bruno C. Valdes, L4m3ness, Nicholas Lalka, Jens Christian Laursen, Jack Dicune, Av Yu, Tom de Bruijn, Viktor Stanchev, shawn wali, Brent Evans, Juan Pablo Desentis, Scott Edwards, Mark Litchfield, Jay Horner, Scott Mitchell, Mustafa Kuroglu, MEAL. LYF, Furkan Akyol, Alex Amster, Nathan O’Connor, Ethan Harris, Christopher Foss, Thomas, Mírzan Campos Duarte, Andrew Pajic, kcdg.dave, Sean Drzewiecki, Jimmy Kneifl, Machtkampf, Daniel Slabík, Lucas RM/HPS Hill, Jannis Krämer, Robby Gottesman, Andrew Coleman, Scott Duchesneau *Space Elevator – Science Fiction or the Future of Mankind?* Help us caption & translate this video!


Every second of your life you are under attack. Bacteria, viruses, spores and more living stuff wants to enter your body and use its resources for itself. The immune system is a powerful army of cells that fights like a T-Rex on speed and sacrifices itself for your survival. Without it you would die in no time. This sounds simple but the reality is complex, beautiful and just awesome. An animation of the immune system. We are thinking of making an App for tablets out of this video. Would you like that? Did you think the visual system we developed worked? Feedback is much appreciated! You can get the MUSIC of the video here: Videos, explaining things. Like evolution, time, space, global energy or our existence in this strange universe. We are a team of designers, journalists and musicians who want to make science look beautiful. Because it is beautiful. Visit us on our Website, Twitter, Facebook, Patreon or Behance to say hi! THANKS A LOT TO OUR PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Justin Degenaars jordan gardner Derek Loa Jeroen Koerts Carlos Campuzano Benoît Graham Scott Zell Tanya Smirnova Giovanna Cardoso Patrick Eyrich Alex Kaplan Chris Dudley Deanie Adams Caroline Andrewes Dean Herbert Rory Bennett Adam Primaeros Rasmus Lind Daniel O.C.L. Dylan Hoffer Maxl Heitsch Eliud Vasquez Neve Laughery Ghitea Andrei Paul Alexander Law McCormack Heavens Eduardo Barbosa Sara Shah Dario Pagnia Chris Doughty Evan Low Stephen Morse Bünyamin Tetik Romano Casellini dante harper Justin T. Greeny Liu Siddharth Bajaj Valerie Brunet Jen Tim Peter Wagner Yousif Efe Melih Polat Gaëtan Maximilian Ritter Charles Kuang Balazs-Hegedus Jozsef Petr Pilař Finn Edwards Thomas Lee Daniel Fuchs Pascal B. Seona Tea Pol Lutgen Roman Zolotorevich Daniel Jonathan Velazquez Gore Jeff Church Churchill Randy Knapp Brandon Liu Peter Žnuderl Swarochisha Kandregula Javier de la Garza Jan Lukas Lehmann somersault18:24 Why you are still alive - The immune system explained Help us caption & translate this video!


A head-vaporizing laser with a perfect wavelength detecting sub-proton space-time ripples. Huge thanks to Prof Rana Adhikari and LIGO: Here's how he felt when he learned about the first ever detection: Thanks to Patreon supporters: Nathan Hansen, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Saeed Alghamdi, Zach Mueller, Ron Neal Support Veritasium on Patreon: A lot of videos have covered the general overview of the discovery of gravitational waves, what they are, the history of the search, when they were found but I wanted to delve into the absurd science that made the detection possible. When scientists want one megawatt of laser power, it's not just for fun (though I'm sure it's that too), it's because the fluctuations in the number of photons is proportional to their square root, making more powerful beams less noisy (as a fraction of their total). The smoothest mirrors were created not for aesthetic joy but because when you're trying to measure wiggles that are a fraction the width of a proton, a rough mirror surface simply won't do. Filmed by Daniel Joseph Files Music by Kevin MacLeod, Black Vortex (appropriately named) Music licensed from Epidemic Sound Observations 2 (also appropriately named)


Help support videos like this: CGPGrey T-Shirts: Go eat some hagelslag: Trust me. Website: This is a 0.0.1 error update. I simply could not live with the reversed flags in the previous version. Twitter: !/cgpgrey Google+: Tumblr:


Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, They don't pay me to like the kids. Her response: Kids don't learn from people they don't like.' A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at Follow TED news on Twitter: Like TED on Facebook: Subscribe to our channel:


The merging of two neutron stars was detected by gravitational waves and then by telescopes in all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. This is a historic detection as it demonstrates: - the first gravitational waves detected from inspiraling neutron stars - the first joint observation by gravitational wave and electromagnetic wave astronomy - identification of a gamma ray burst in conjunction with merging neutron stars - how gravitational waves and gamma rays can be used together to locate their source All evidence so far indicates that the data support General Relativity. Special thanks to Patreon supporters: Tony Fadell, Donal Botkin, Curational, Jeff Straathof, Zach Mueller, Ron Neal, Nathan Hansen, Corvi Support Veritasium on Patreon: Graphics from: Jets and Debris from a Neutron Star Collision This animation captures phenomena observed over the course of nine days following the neutron star merger known as GW170817. They include gravitational waves (pale arcs); a near-light-speed jet that produced gamma rays (magenta); expanding debris from a kilonova that produced ultraviolet (violet), optical and infrared (blue-white to red) emission; and, once the jet directed toward us expanded into our view from Earth, X-rays (blue). Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab Virgo Helps Localize Gravitational-Wave Signals Sky localizations of gravitational-wave signals detected by LIGO beginning in 2015 (GW150914, LVT151012, GW151226, GW170104), and, more recently, by the LIGO-Virgo network (GW170814, GW170817). After Virgo came online in August 2017, scientists were better able to localize the gravitational-wave signals. The background is an optical image of the Milky Way. The localizations of GW150914, LVT151012, and GW170104 wrap around the celestial sphere, so the sky map is shown with a translucent dome. Credit: LIGO/Virgo/NASA/Leo Singer (Milky Way image: Axel Mellinger) Variety of Gravitational Waves and a Chirp The signal measured by LIGO and Virgo from the neutron star merger GW170817 is compared here to previously detected binary black hole mergers. All signals are shown starting at 30 Hertz, and the progression of GW170817 is shown in real time, accompanied by its conversion to audio heard at the end of the movie. GW170817 was observable for more than 30 times longer than any previous gravitational-wave signal. Credit: LIGO/University of Oregon/Ben Farr LIGO is funded by the NSF, and operated by Caltech and MIT, which conceived of LIGO and led the Initial and Advanced LIGO projects. Financial support for the Advanced LIGO project was led by the NSF with Germany (Max Planck Society), the U.K. (Science and Technology Facilities Council) and Australia (Australian Research Council) making significant commitments and contributions to the project. More than 1,200 scientists and some 100 institutions from around the world participate in the effort through the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, which includes the GEO Collaboration and the Australian collaboration OzGrav. Additional partners are listed at The Virgo collaboration consists of more than 280 physicists and engineers belonging to 20 different European research groups: six from Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in France; eight from the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) in Italy; two in the Netherlands with Nikhef; the MTA Wigner RCP in Hungary; the POLGRAW group in Poland; Spain with the University of Valencia; and the European Gravitational Observatory, EGO, the laboratory hosting the Virgo detector near Pisa in Italy, funded by CNRS, INFN, and Nikhef.


In which John Green teaches you about the beginnings of the American Revolution in a video titled The Seven Years War. Confusing? Maybe. John argues that the Seven Years War, which is often called the French and Indian War in the US, laid a lot of the groundwork for the Revolution. More confusing? Why does this war have two names? Why were the French and Indians fighting each other? The Seven Years war was actually a global war that went on for nine years. I think I'm having trouble making this clear. Anyway, the part of this global war that happened in North America was the French and Indian War. The French and Indian tribes were the force opposing the British, so that's the name that stuck. Let's get away from this war, as it makes my head hurt. Other stuff was going on in the colonies in the 18th century that primed the people for revolution. One was the Great Awakening. Religious revival was sweeping the country, introducing new ideas about religion and how it should be practiced. At the same time thinkers like John Locke were rethinking the relationship between rulers and the ruled. So in this highly charged atmosphere, you can just imagine what would happen if the crown started trying to exert more control over the colonies. The colonists would probably just rise up, right? We'll see what happens next week. Read the Mystery Document in its entirety in the Minutes of the Provincial Province of Pennsylvania Vol. IX: Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. Learn about how the European struggle for dominance throughout the French and Indian War impacted natives in North America: Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @saysdanica @thoughtbubbler Like us! Look at this! thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon:


Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel: Chris Lonsdale is Managing Director of Chris Lonsdale & Associates, a company established to catalyse breakthrough performance for individuals and senior teams. In addition, he has also developed a unique and integrated approach to learning that gives people the means to acquire language or complex technical knowledge in short periods of time. Jan-21-2014 Update. The video transcripts are now available via the following links: English Only: English + Chinese Translation: In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)


We're kicking off our exploration of muscles with a look at the complex and important relationship between actin and myosin. Your smooth, cardiac, and skeletal muscles create movement by contracting and releasing in a process called the sliding filament model. Your skeletal muscles are constructed like a rope made of bundles of protein fibers, and that the smallest strands are your actin and myosin myofilaments. Its their use of calcium and ATP that causes the binding and unbinding that makes sarcomeres contract and relax. Table of Contents Smooth, Cardiac, and Skeletal Muscles Create Movement 1:18 Sliding Filament Model 4:52 Skeletal Muscles Are Made of Bundles of Protein Fibers 2:40 Actin and Myosin Myofilaments 3:54 Calcium and ATP Cause the Binding and Unbinding 5:05 *** Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Sandra Aft, Brad Wardell, Christian Ludvigsen, Robert Kunz, Jason, A Saslow, Jacob Ash, Jeffrey Thompson, Jessica Simmons, James Craver, Simun Niclasen, SR Foxley, Roger C. Rocha, Nevin, Spoljaric, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jessica Wode ***SUBBABLE MESSAGES*** TO: SEM students FROM: Mrs. S You are confident and courageous! I believe in you! DFTBA! -- TO: Zachary FROM: She who gave you life! You, like the Mongols, will always be the exception. ***SUPPORTER THANK YOU!*** Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: David Rybka, Beth Larter, Damian Shaw, Randy Goldberg MD, Cynthia Krohn, Allison DeVoe, Brinae Lois Gaudet, Sara Bovi, Stephen DeCubellis, Travis Bell -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - Twitter - Tumblr - Support Crash Course on Patreon: CC Kids:


The Salton Sea is the largest body of water in California, home to the second most diverse group of birds in America and it exists by accident. Another great video on the Salton Sea: I used archive from this video. Music by Kevin MacLeod, ‘Mirage’, ‘Hyperfun’, ‘Marty Gots a Plan’, ‘Past the Edge’


In 2015 the bees are still dying in masses. Which at first seems not very important until you realize that one third of all food humans consume would disappear with them. Millions could starve. The foes bees face are truly horrifying – some are a direct consequence of human greed. We need to help our small buzzing friends or we will face extremely unpleasant consequences. Check out THE NOVA PROJECT: You can make subtitles for the video here: Videos, explaining things. Like evolution, time, space, global energy or our existence in this strange universe. We are a team of designers, journalists and musicians who want to make science look beautiful. Because it is beautiful. You can get the MUSIC for the video here: Visit us on our Website, Twitter, Facebook, Patreon or Behance to say hi! THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Nathan Ardoin, Collin Rudkin, Karantor, Wesley Alexander, Alpaca Belle, william töyrä, Jasen Tamiia, Heeyun Chung, Ethan Wriston, Hoi-Fung, David Wilson, Morgan Rigby, Harrison Bross, Jacob Ash, lukas hulting, Katharine Foster, Nick Ingenito, Adithi Pandit, David Walsh, Oliver, gianmaria nicolis, Swaroop Narayan Manjunath, beeweasd, Giacomo Bersani, Evan Wilson, Matthew Fey, Nicholas Romano, Franco, Andrew Rehkopf, Tyler O'Connor, Fabi, Wait But Why, Brian, Carlos Rubio Abujas, Weronika Falkowska, Aaron, Carlos Carrasco, Christopher Setiobudi, Callum Howells Luke Kutschinski, Geoffrey Lee, Brian David Henderson, Sébastien Blanchet, Stefan Ghizelea, Chris Smith, Sofian Madi, Jay Kidd, James Khoo, Eugene Foss, Spencer Clark, Robert Varasciuc, THEGURUDK, Erika Marks, Aurelien Gouny, Romi Kuntsman, Harry, Nicolas Huguet-Latour, Simon Thibodeau, Michael, Marc Dumont, Yeonghoon Park, Samuel Pacheco, Dave Hng, Mikkel Jespersen, Jerome Dimaano, Danylo Bozhagora, ryandelsol, Anton Sterenborg, Mason Y, Simon Welker, Demian Rosenblatt, Julius Hofman, Richard Harrison, Daniel P, Reinaldo Mizutani, Emil, A Patron, Þorsteinn Sævar Hjartarson, Davy Corbett, Veselin Kostadinov, Darth Hawke The death of bees explained – Colony Collapse disorder Help us caption & translate this video!


LotR Wallpapers: Official discussion at: Hello Internet Podcast on The Hobbit: t=2455 Special Thanks: Patreons: Robert Kunz, Michael Diaz, Kim Lindh, James Earle, Matthew Czerniejewski, PervertedThomas, rictic, Ian, Saki Comandao, Edward DeLany, Ron Bowes, Tómas Árni Jónasson, Michael Morden, Mikko, Derek Bonner, Derek Jackson, Iain Flockton, Jim, Sokhom Chhim, Finn Kelly, Dan, Christine Dönszelmann, Orbit_Junkie, Mark Elders, Lars-Göran, Jake Stolhandske, Shawn Bazin, Eren Polat, Veronica Peshterianu, Daniel Heeb, Ernesto Jimenez, Paul Tomblin, Travis Wichert, Andrew Bailey, Teddy, Yousef Hasan, Ruud Hermans, Keng, Alex Morales, Ryan E Manning, Linh, Erik Parasiuk, Rhys Parry, Arian Flores, Maarten van der Blij, Eric Stangeland, Sam Kokin, Kevin Anderson, Gustavo Jimenez, Thomas Petersen, Kyle Bloom, Osric Lord-Williams, Myke Hurley, David, Ryan Nielsen, Esteban Santana Santana, Terry Steiner, Dag Viggo Lokøen, Tristan Watts-Willis, John Rogers, Edward Adams, Ryan, Kevin, Nicolae Berbece, Alex Prescott, Leon, Alexander Kosenkov, Daniel Slater, Sunny Yin, Sigurður Snær Eiríksson, Maxime Zielony, Anders, ken mcfarlane, AUFFRAY Clement, Aaron, Bill Wolf, Himesh Sheth, Thomas Weir, Caswal Parker, Brandon Callender, Stephen Litt Belch, Sean Church, Pierre Perrott, Mr.Z, Timothy Moran, Peter Lomax, Quin Thames, Ørjan Sollie, Emil, Kelsey Wainwright, Richard Harrison, Ali Moeeny, Lachlan Holmes, John Bevan, Dan Hiel, Callas, John Lee, Tijmen van Dien, ShiroiYami, thomas van til, Owen Degen, Tobias Gies, Alex Schuldberg, Ryan Constantin, Jerry Lin, Rasmus Svensson, Bear, Lars, Jacob Ostling, Cody Fitzgerald, Guillaume PERRIN, John Waltmans, Solon Carter, Joel Wunderle, Rescla, GhostDivision, Andrew Proue, David Lombardo, Tor Henrik Lehne, David Palomares, Cas Eliëns, paul everitt, Karl Johan Stensland Dy, Freddi Hørlyck, Juan Villagrana, Jim, Ian N Riopel, Ilan, Elizabeth Keathley, Stephen, Borislav Slavov, Jessie, Israel Armando, Jennifer Richardson, Rustam Anvarov Artwork: Music: Lord of the Ring Map: zoom=3&lat=-1692.5&lon=1500&layers=BTTTTT


View full lesson: You’re the realm’s greatest mathematician, but ever since you criticized the Emperor’s tax laws, you’ve been locked in the dungeon. Luckily for you, one of the Emperor’s governors has been convicted of paying his taxes with a counterfeit coin, which has made its way into the treasury. Can you earn your freedom by finding the fake? Jennifer Lu shows how. Lesson by Jennifer Lu, animation by Artrake Studio.


Why is there a bright spot behind spherical objects? Be the first to find out about new projects: Filmed by Nathan Watkins and Raquel Nuno, animation by Meg Rosenburg. Music by Kevin MacLeod, 'Scissors' 'Mirage' ' Marty Gots a Plan'. Special thanks to Laura Vican for helping with the experiment. References: Why Toast Lands Jelly-side Down: Zen and the Art of Physics Demonstrations By Robert Ehrlich


View full lesson: Nostalgia was once considered an illness confined to specific groups of people. Today, people all over the world report experiencing and enjoying nostalgia. But how does nostalgia work? And is it healthy? Clay Routledge details the way our understanding of nostalgia has changed since the term was first coined in the late 17th century. Lesson by Clay Routledge, animation by Anton Bogaty.


Official Discussion on Special thanks: McSteed TV: Scott Weinberg: @ryannamba tfpauly Martin Fixman Yhson44 Gidister Tom Jefferson Lisa Lyons @thesteveewin Chris Vogt Sebastián Andreas Margery Monge Jordan Hunter Jackson Nary Weis Dan Lapsley Audrius Zujus Ian Holliday Chris Farquhar Becca Rickwood Sean Murphy @seanbob4444 on twitter! Nicholas Hartikainen Timothy LaDuca ESKN Racketen Don C Ludtke @donludtke Alex Quinn Colby Patterson Jordan Hunter Jackson Richard Williams @simoneconnola Clay Compton Alex (NegativeZer0) Perelgut


View full lesson: The highly virulent Ebola virus has seen a few major outbreaks since it first appeared in 1976 -- with the worst epidemic occurring in 2014. How does the virus spread, and what exactly does it do to the body? Alex Gendler details what Ebola is and why it's so hard to study. Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Andrew Foerster.


Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity. The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Check out more TED Talks: Follow TED on Twitter: Like TED on Facebook: Subscribe to our channel:


Use the URL: to get a free audiobook and 30 days free trial and support this channel. Thanks a lot to Audible for supporting us! Humans. We have been around for a while now. When we think about our past we think about ancient civilizations, the pyramids, stuff like that. But this is only a tiny, tiny part of our history. Support us on Patreon so we can make more stuff (and get cool stuff in return): Kurzgesagt merch here: Get the music of the video here: soundcloud: bandcamp: THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: William Kerr, Sean Beier, Donal Botkin, Hugo NAJBERG, Harley Faggetter, robert walsh, Amir Shahar, Corey Hinds, Vegard Bellika, Dasha, Charles LaVene, Wesley Kleeman, jeremy avnet, Zachary Dickson, Timothy Basanov, Richard Stambaugh, Hamish Wilson, John Smith, Tyler Lainer, Yalın Günayer, Drew DeVault, Nicholas Bethencourt, Mike Wiley, Stefan Schnitzer, Brian Coule, John Markus, Sergey Sirotenko, Alex Howe, Angel Ivan Luna Parra, Liam Wade, Hannah Montovani, Noah Harris, David Durant, Hans-Jörg Peter, Daniel McCartney, Marcus Lee, Martin Atanasov, Plyrde Rayos, Emin Arslan ,Sam, Adam, TheVerySeriousLewis, Sam, Shermaine Chew, Sathepine, Manraj Dhaliwal, César Mendonça, Corne Kruger, Andrew Peachey, Thomas, Müller, Daniel, Forssten, Matthew Tse, Matthias S., Azila Azman, Fras Samarit, Jake Wood What Happened Before History? Human Origins Help us caption & translate this video!


Discuss this video: Robots, Etc: Terex Port automation: Command | Cat MieStar System.: Bosch Automotive Technology: Atlas Update: Kiva Systems: PhantomX running Phoenix code: iRobot, Do You: New pharmacy robot at QEHB: Briggo Coffee Experience: John Deere Autosteer ITEC Pro 2010. In use while cultivating: The Duel: Timo Boll vs. KUKA Robot: Baxter with the Power of Intera 3: Baxter Research Robot SDK 1.0: Baxter the Bartender: Online Cash Registers Touch-Screen EPOS System Demonstration: Self-Service Check in: Robot to play Flappy Bird: e-david from University of Konstanz, Germany: Sedasys: Empty Car Convoy: Clever robots for crops: Autonomously folding a pile of 5 previously-unseen towels: t=94 LS3 Follow Tight: Robotic Handling material: Caterpillar automation project: Universal Robots has reinvented industrial robotics: Introducing WildCat: The Human Brain Project - Video Overview: This Robot Is Changing How We Cure Diseases: Jeopardy! - Watson Game 2: What Will You Do With Watson?: Other Credits Mandelbrot set: Moore's law graph: Apple II 1977: Beer Robot Fail m2803: All Wales Ambulance Promotional Video: Clyde Robinson: Time lapse Painting - Monster Spa:


I am working on some big new projects I'm excited to share with you! Join the Veritasium email list so you don't miss out: So this video is a little different from most of the others. The channel is an element of truth, after all, not an element of science. This is my truth. It may not be everyone's but that's ok too. Clips included were from: Chernobyl and Pripyat - drone shots from shooting Uranium Obsidian dome, California Panum Crater El Capitan The Pyramids of Giza Toronto buildings The Holocaust Memorial in Berlin Abu Simbel temple at Aswan, Egypt Sydney Harbour Milky way time-lapse from the badlands of South Australia Sunset over Warrnambool, Victoria Big Bang animation courtesy of NASA Sunrise over Bondi Water off New Caledonia Great white sharks in the Neptune Islands, South Australia Crosswalk at Town Hall Sydney EDUtubers at the YouTube EDU summit in San Francisco Concert in Sydney Jetpacking in Western Sydney Vi's triangles at Perimeter Institute, Waterloo Canada Aurora Borealis north of Fairbanks Alaska Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain Hiking with MinutePhysics in Washington State Music Licensed from cuesongs.com The Secret Tower by Nicholas O


View full lesson here: The ubiquitous yin-yang symbol holds its roots in Taoism/Daoism, a Chinese religion and philosophy. The yin, the dark swirl, is associated with shadows, femininity, and the trough of a wave; the yang, the light swirl, represents brightness, passion and growth. John Bellaimey explains why we all contain the spirit of yin and of yang -- and how we can achieve a balance of both in our lives. Lesson by John Bellaimey, animation by TED-Ed.


Designer babies, the end of diseases, genetically modified humans that never age. Outrageous things that used to be science fiction are suddenly becoming reality. The only thing we know for sure is that things will change irreversibly. Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): Kurzgesagt merch here: Get the music of the video here: soundcloud: bandcamp: Thanks to Volker Henn, James Gurney and (prefers anonymity) for help with this video! THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Jeffrey Schneider, Konstantin Kaganovich, Tom Leiser, Archie Castillo, Russell Eishard, Ben Kershaw, Marius Stollen, Henry Bowman, Ben Johns, Bogdan Radu, Sam Toland, Pierre Thalamy, Christopher Morgan, Rocks Arent People, Ross Devereux, Pascal Michaud, Derek DuBreuil, Sofia Quintero, Robert Swiniarski, Merkt Kızılırmak, Michelle Rowley, Andy Dong, Saphir Patel, Harris Rotto, Thomas Huzij, Ryan James Burke, NTRX, Chaz Lewis, Amir Resali, The War on Stupid, John Pestana, Lucien Delbert, iaDRM, Jacob Edwards, Lauritz Klaus, Jason Hunt, Marcus : ), Taylor Lau, Rhett H Eisenberg, Mr.Z, Jeremy Dumet, Fatman13, Kasturi Raghavan, Kousora, Rich Sekmistrz, Mozart Peter, Gaby Germanos, Andreas Hertle, Alena Vlachova, Zdravko Šašek SOURCES AND FURTHER READING: The best book we read about the topic: GMO Sapiens (affiliate link, we get a cut if buy the book!) – Good Overview by Wired: –timeline of computer development: – Selective breeding: – DNA: – Radiation research: – inserting DNA snippets into organisms: – First genetically modified animal: – First GM patent: – chemicals produced by GMOs: – Flavr Savr Tomato: – First Human Engineering: – glowing fish: – CRISPR: – HIV cut from cells and rats with CRISPR: – first human CRISPR trials fighting cancer: first human CRISPR trial approved by Chinese for August 2016: – genetic diseases: – pregnancies with Down Syndrome terminated: ( 1999 European study) – CRISPR and aging: Help us caption & translate this video!


All the large-scale structure in the universe may owe its existence to nothing. Sponsored by the Dyson 360 Eye Robot ad: Support Veritasium on Patreon: Thanks to Patreon supporters: Bryan Baker, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Saeed Alghamdi Let's see how clearly I can explain this. We think of empty space as, well. empty, the epitome of nothingness. But as our understanding of physics has evolved we have realized that it's not truly empty. Space is filled with fields. There is a field for every subatomic particle. One for electrons, up quarks, down quarks, neutrinos and so on. In empty space these fields are basically zero, flat, nil. But it's impossible to make them perfectly zero so there are always some quantum fluctuations in the fields, even in a perfect vacuum. These are sometimes called virtual particles but they should really just be thought of as little disturbances in the field. Vacuum fluctuation play a role mediating the interactions of subatomic particles but they don't really have an impact on the large-scale structure of the universe, EXCEPT during inflation, right after the big bang when the universe increased in size 10^26 times. Due to this rapid expansion, those tiny fluctuations were blown up to the scale of the observable universe. And we know this by looking at the cosmic microwave background radiation where we can see slightly hotter and cooler parts of the early universe that correspond to density fluctuations. And it is these density fluctuations that allowed matter to clump together into large structures like the gigantic gas clouds that would go on to contain stars and planets. In case the video isn't clear, this is what I've been trying to say. Animations by Gustavo Rosa This video was sponsored in part by Dyson ad


Student guides Karen and Christian lead you on a whirlwind tour of the Stanford campus. The tour begins at Stanford Stadium, home to Cardinal football, and ends at the Stanford Visitor Center. Along they way you'll see the Quad, the Dish, and even do a little fountain hopping. This video was originally produced for the launch of the PAC12 Network, Stanford University: Stanford University Channel on YouTube:


View full lesson: Among the top prestigious awards in the world, the Nobel Peace Prize has honored some of the most celebrated and revered international figures and organizations in history. But how does the nomination process work? And who exactly is eligible? Adeline Cuvelier and Toril Rokseth detail the specifics of the Nobel Peace Prize. Lesson by Toril Rokseth and Adeline Cuvelier (of Nobel Peace Center), animation by Zedem Media.


Why does time appear to speed up as we get older? Can we slow it down? Thanks to the National Geographic Channel for sponsoring this video! The new season of Brain Games starts Sunday, February 14th at 9/8c - Brain Games is an Emmy-nominated TV series that explores the inner workings of the human mind through experiments and interactive games. Did you know it's estimated that you have more than a dozen senses in addition to the standard five? One of those is a sense of time or chronoception. Tune in to the new season of Brain Games to learn about all of your senses, and more, starting Sunday, February 14 at 9/8c References: Ageing and duration judgement: Nerve conduction velocity slowing with age: Experiments with rats suggest time perception is distributed across brain: Time perception with repeated stimuli: Energy usage in brain with age: Time perception in moments of fear / danger: Attention’s relation to time perception and recollection of perceived time:


The crazy story of the arbitrary temperature scale used in a tiny minority of countries. Check out Audible: Snatoms are available again! Support Veritasium on Patreon: Celsius didn't invent Celsius: Video animated by Marcello Ascani: Thanks to Patreon supporters: Nathan Hansen, Bryan Baker, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Saeed Alghamdi Music by Kevin MacLeod: Modern Piano Zeta - Improbable Ice Demon Divertimento K131 Sneaky Adventure Sheep May Safely Graze Professor and the Plant References: A History of the Thermometer and its uses in Meteorology by W. E. Knowles Middleton Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold by Tom Shachtman The Science of Measurement, A Historical Survey by Herbert Arthur Klein Lehrbuch der Chemie by Jöns Jakob Berzelius Script: As an Australian-Canadian the Fahrenheit temperature scale always seemsed a bit arbitrary. I mean why does water freeze at 32 degrees? And what exactly does zero represent? According to many sources the Fahrenheit scale was defined by setting zero degrees equal to the temperature of an ice, salt, and water mixture and 100 degrees being roughly equal to human body temperature. But that isn’t true. The real story is much more interesting, and scientific. August 14th 1701 was almost certainly the worst day in the life of fifteen year-old Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit. On that day both of his parents died suddenly from mushroom poisoning. He was sent from Poland, where he lived, to Amsterdam to become an apprentice bookkeeper. But Fahrenheit couldn’t stand his apprenticeship and ran away so many times his employers put out a warrant for his arrest. Traveling from city to city around Europe, he became fascinated with scientific instruments and in particular thermometers. In 1708, possibly seeking help with the warrant, Fahrenheit met with the mayor of Copenhagen, who happened to be the famous astronomer Ole Romer. Romer is known for observing the eclipses of Jupiter’s moons and realizing that variations in the timing of those eclipses was caused by the time it took light to reach Earth. In other words, he found a way to accurately measure the finite speed of light. But more pertinent to this story, in 1702 Romer was housebound after breaking his leg. To pass the time he devised a new temperature scale with the freezing point of water at 7.5 degrees and body temperature at 22.5 degrees. This might seem odd until you consider that Romer wanted the boiling point of water to be 60 degrees (as an astronomer, he had experience dividing things by 60). If you take this scale, divide it in half, in half again, and in half once more, you find the freezing point of water 1/8th up the scale, and human body temperature 3/8th up the scale. So at their meeting in 1708, Fahrenheit learned of Romer’s temperature scale and adopted it as his own, adjusting it slightly because he found it “inconvenient and inelegant on account of the fractional numbers”. So he scaled them up to 8 and 24. That is the original Fahrenheit scale. He produced thermometers for some time using this scale. But then, at some later time Fahrenheit multiplied all numbers on his scale by four, setting freezing point to the now familiar 32 and body temperature to 96. It’s unclear exactly why he did this. He may just have wanted finer precision in his measurements but I think there was a better reason. You see, Fahrenheit was an excellent instrument maker. His thermometers agreed with each other precisely, at a time when that was unheard of. He pioneered the use of mercury as a measuring liquid, which has the benefit of a much higher boiling point than the alcohol used in most other thermometers at the time. For these accomplishments, he was inducted into the British Royal Society. And we know he read the works of Newton, Boyle, and Hooke, in which he would have come across the idea that a one degree increase in temperature should correspond to a specific fractional increase in the volume of the measuring liquid. And today a one degree Fahrenheit increase in temperature increases the volume of mercury by exactly one part in 10,000. Is this just a coincidence? We’ll probably never know for sure because as an instrument maker Fahrenheit was secretive about his methods. But I think the data strongly suggests this was the case. So what exactly did zero represent on the scales of Fahrenheit and Romer? By many accounts it’s the temperature of a salt, ice and water mixture. But there are different descriptions of these mixtures and none of them actually produces the temperature they’re supposed to. More likely I think they picked the coldest temperature in winter, set that as zero and later used ice and brine to calibrate new thermometers. Now his scale is only used regularly in the Cayman Islands, Bahamas, Belize, oh and the United States of America.


In which John Green teaches you where American politicians come from. In the beginning, soon after the US constitution was adopted, politics were pretty non-existent. George Washington was elected president with no opposition, everything was new and exciting, and everyone just got along. For several months. Then the contentious debate about the nature of the United States began, and it continues to this day. Washington and his lackey/handler Alexander Hamilton pursued an elitist program of federalism. They attempted to strengthen the central government, create a strong nation-state, and leave less of the governance to the states, They wanted to create debt, encourage manufacturing, and really modernize the new nation/ The opposition, creatively known as the anti-federalists, wanted to build some kind of agrarian pseudo-paradise where every (white) man could have his own farm, and live a free, self-reliant life. The founding father who epitomized this view was Thomas Jefferson. By the time Adams became president, the anti-federalists had gotten the memo about how alienating a name like anti-federalist can be. It's so much more appealing to voters if your party is for something rather than being defined by what you're against, you know? In any case, Jefferson and his acolytes changed their name to the Democratic-Republican Party, which covered a lot of bases, and proceeded to protest nearly everything Adams did. Lest you think this week is all boring politics,you'll be thrilled to hear this episode has a Whiskey Rebellion, a Quasi-War, anti-French sentiment, some controversial treaties, and something called the XYZ Affair, which sounds very exciting. Learn all about it this week with John Green. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. Much of America's politics came from debates between democratic republican Thomas Jefferson and federalist Alexander Hamilton: While Jefferson would go on to become president, Hamilton heavily influenced President George Washington who set many American political ideals in his farewell address that Hamilton helped craft: Follow us! Turn on the captions. You'll like them. Support CrashCourse on Patreon:


Explanation of gyro precession: More: Less Than: Equal To: Huge thanks to A/Prof Emeritus Rod Cross, Helen Georgiou for filming, Alex Yeung, and Chris Stewart, the University of Sydney Mechanical Engineering shop, Duncan and co. Ralph and the School of Physics. In this video I attempt to lift a 19kg (42 lbs) wheel over my head one-handed while it's spinning at a few thousand RPM. This replicates an earlier experiment by Professor Eric Laithwaite. He claimed the wheel was 'light as a feather' and could not be explained by Newton's Laws. I wanted to find out for myself what I really felt like. Music By Kevin MacLeod Tempting Secrets


The world's roundest object helps solve the longest running problem in measurement -- how to define the kilogram. Support Veritasium on Patreon: A kilogram isn't what it used to be. Literally. The original name for it was the 'grave', proposed in 1793 but it fell victim to the French Revolution like its creator, Lavoisier. So begins the tale of the most unusual SI unit. The kilogram is the only base unit with a prefix in its name, and the only one still defined by a physical artifact, the international prototype kilogram or IPK. But the problem with this definition has long been apparent. The IPK doesn't seem to maintain its mass compared to 40 similar cylinders minted at the same time. The goal is therefore to eliminate the kilogram's dependence on a physical object. Two main approaches are being considered to achieve this end: the Avogadro Project and the Watt Balance. The Avogadro project aims to redefine Avogadro's constant (currently defined by the kilogram -- the number of atoms in 12 g of carbon-12) and reverse the relationship so that the kilogram is precisely specified by Avogadro's constant. This method required creating the most perfect sphere on Earth. It is made out of a single crystal of silicon 28 atoms. By carefully measuring the diameter, the volume can be precisely specified. Since the atom spacing of silicon is well known, the number of atoms in a sphere can be accurately calculated. This allows for a very precise determination of Avogadro's constant. Special thanks to Katie Green, Dr. David Farrant, the CSIRO, and the National Measurment Institute for their help. Thanks also to Nessy Hill for filming and reviewing earlier drafts of this video. There is debate as to whether this is truly the roundest object ever created. The Gravity Probe-B rotors are also spherical with very low tolerances such that they may in fact be rounder. Music by Kevin McLeod (incompetech.com) Decision, Danse Macabre, Scissors


In the 1950s, the people of Minamata, Japan started seeing strange behavior from the local cats, and it wasn't long before humans were showing the same symptoms. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: D.A. Noe, Nicholas Smith, سلطان الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Bella Nash, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, Tim Curwick, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Fatima Iqbal ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: ---------- Sources: Images:


In Lancaster, California, there's a musical road. When you drive over it, it plays the William Tell Overture. Unfortunately, it's out of tune. Here's why. Thanks to David Simmons-Duffin, who figured this out about nine years ago: -- he seems to be the first to have figured out not just that it's wrong, but exactly what happened! I'm at on Twitter at on Facebook at and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo


If you repeat something enough times, it comes to feel good and true. Support Veritasium on Patreon: Science with Hot Wheels! My vids for kids: More info on cognitive ease: This episode was inspired by the book Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman. This video was edited by Daniel Joseph Files, with music from Kevin MacLeod at Marty Gots a Plan Sing Along With Jim and Full On. Veritasium is supported on Patreon by: Jason Buster, Saeed Alghamdi, Tony Fadell, Donal Botkin, Bryan Baker, & Imthetroublesolver 8)


Cell biology gives clues to why we age and lobsters don't. I made another video! The future of energy: Check out Breakthrough, Sundays at 9/8c on Nat Geo with GE ad Animations are from Emmy-winning film 'Immortal', reproduced here courtesy of December Media and Genepool Productions (previously Pemberton Films) Check out Immortal here: Find out more about telomeres and telomerase here: Special thanks to Dr. Fiona Ginty, Principal Scientist in the Life Sciences and Molecular Diagnostics Group at GE. Her research focuses on imaging different proteins within the cell. It's both a very powerful technique and it's beautiful. Filmed by Raquel Nuno and Vasilios Sfinarolakis Aging makeup by Heather Grippaldi: Music by Kevin MacLeod, Past the Edge and Lightless Dawn


Graduating University of Michigan students made a video to show the incoming Class of 2016 what the letter M means to them. UmichVictors


I've created an educational product to help people learn chemistry! You can buy it here:


The best and worst predictions in science are both based on the same underlying physics Check out the Great Courses Plus: Support Veritasium on Patreon: Special thanks to: Prof. Sean Carroll Prof. Brian Schmidt Prof. Stephen Bartlett Prof. Geraint Lewis More on this topic: Patreon supporters: Bryan Baker, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Jason Buster, Saeed Alghamdi, Nathan Hansen Virtual particles are a way of talking about fields and their interactions as though particles are doing all the work. This is why there is some controversy around using the term 'virtual particles'. Some people think the term is useful, especially since in calculating with Feynman diagrams you draw all the particle interactions that are possible (and then do the calculations to get the right answer). While others feel this terminology is misleading because virtual particles don't behave like real particles and can't be observed.


Would you choose to build a house on top of an unfinished foundation? Of course not. Why, then, do we rush students through education when they haven't always grasped the basics? Yes, it's complicated, but educator Sal Khan shares his plan to turn struggling students into scholars by helping them master concepts at their own pace. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at Follow TED news on Twitter: Like TED on Facebook: Subscribe to our channel:


How does a Killer T Cell Kill its target? Our new film captures the behaviour of cytotoxic T cells – the body’s ‘serial killers’ – as they hunt down and eliminate cancer cells before moving on to their next target.


Can you find the mistakes? I am student , I am agree , Yesterday, I'm go downtown , He no have money , I want to meet the downtown. If you don't know, this is the lesson for you! These are mistakes made by students of all levels, so watch this video and learn to avoid these common errors. Take the quiz here: And don't forget to check out our other video on 5 common English learner mistakes: TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on five more common English learner mistakes. So if you have watched my other video on five common English learner mistakes, this is a follow up to give you five more. So let's not waste time and get right to it. Here we go with No. 1. So this first mistake is common because in many languages, when you discuss jobs or your station in life, you don't use articles even if you come from a country where there are articles in the language. So for example, I am student. He is engineer. If I ask you, What do you do , you need to use an article because student is countable; it's singular; and engineer' is countable and it's singular. So you have to say, I am a student. He is an engineer. Now, let's move on to No. 2. Okay. Here, we have two sentences on the board. We have, I am agree. Are you agree? So in this situation, agree is a verb. We don't say, I am agree. You can just say, I agree. If it's negative, I don't agree or, I disagree. And the question is not, Are you agree? It's, Do you agree? Now, if you are set on wanting to say I am and use agree in some way, you would have to say, I am in agreement. This is very formal, but it is possible. Otherwise, you say, I agree or, I disagree and, Do you agree? Now, let's move on to No. 3. This next mistake is about the use of the past tense. For new English speakers, because they can't form the past tense, sometimes they use the verb to be with the verb. So I have heard, I'm go downtown yesterday. Or, He was see his cousin. If you are speaking in the past, make sure you simply use the past simple verb. In this situation, we don't say I'm go. The past of go is went. I went downtown. We don't say he was see. The past of see is saw. So this is about using the past simple form of the verb to speak about the past. Never say I'm go , I'm do , I'm make. I saw ; I made ; I did ; I played. Okay? Now, let's move on to No. 4. Now, this mistake is about using negatives. In many languages, whether they're European or Latin, Spanish, I hear this frequently. So you might hear, He no have money or, They no like chocolate. So if you are making a sentence in the sent simple, and you want to make it negative, you have to use doesn't and don't. So not he no have but, He doesn't have. Okay? Not they no like chocolate but, They don't like chocolate. So make sure you learn how to make negative sentences. He doesn't ; I don't ; we don't ; they don't ; not he no , she no , I no. All right? Now, let's move on to No. 5. Finally, here we have a word choice error. And this is because maybe speakers translate from their own language, and many languages, you can use the verbs meet or know to talk about going to places and getting to know cities and towns, for example. So, I want to meet the city or, Yesterday, I knew downtown. Now, in English, we don't really use the verbs know and meet to talk about getting to know a place. You can use the verbs explore or get to know or visit. So you can say, you know, I want to explore the city. I want to go around the city. Yesterday, I knew downtown -- Yesterday, I traveled around downtown. And you can also use terms like get to know a place. You can visit a place. You can explore a place. Okay? But you can't meet a park. You can meet a person, but you can't meet a place. Now, let's review all five of these mistakes one more time. All right. So to review, No. 1, I am a student. If you want to talk about your status in life. Are you a student? An engineer? Are you a teacher? Etc. you need to use an article to talk about jobs, professions, talk about your station in life. No. 2, I agree, not I am agree. Do you agree? Not are you agree? No. 3, I went downtown. I saw my cousin. So remember, memorize those past tense verbs. Not I was go or I am go. I went ; I saw ; I did. All right?


You like space exploration, and we like space exploration. So why aren't we investigating our closest to galactic neighbor, the triple star system Alpha Centauri? Is it time to give interstellar travel a shot? How would we do it? Hank explains our options, and lays out the challenges. Short version: You're gonna have to be patient! Like SciShow? Want to get cool things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: -- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Thanks Tank Tumblr: Sources for this episode: ;


Check out all of TED-Ed's book recommendations: View full lesson: Over the course of history, we’ve discovered hundreds of thousands of asteroids. But how do astronomers discover these bits of rock and metal? How many have they found? And how do they tell asteroids apart? Carrie Nugent shares the story of the very first asteroid ever discovered and explains how asteroid hunters search for these celestial bodies. Lesson by Carrie Nugent, directed by TED-Ed, animation by Reza Riahi. Check out our Patreon page here: Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible. Rishi Pasham, John Christian S. Ramos, Bev Millar, Merit Gamertsfelder, Lex Azevedo, Noa Shore, Taylor Hunter, Kyle Nguyen, Bijan Bayat Mokhtari, Elias Wewel, Henry Li, Ayaan Heban, Joanne Luce, Michael Aquilina, Jason A Saslow, Yansong Li, MJ Tan Mingjie, Fabio Peters, Silas Schwarz, Cristóbal Medina Moenne, Tsz Lung.


Why do droplets of food coloring attract, repel, and chase each other? Snatoms molecular models: More about this topic: Original paper on droplets: Marangoni Flow: Surface Energy: Filming and master pipetting by Raquel Nuno Research and writing by Aaron White


Today we are presenting you a video on an unusual topic. Imagine that all people suddenly disappeared from the planet. The reason is irrelevant, just imagine the result. Now we are going to tell what is going to happen after we are gone.


During New Student Orientation, incoming freshmen and transfer students dive into the academic, social and cultural life of Stanford. ___________ Special thanks to Harry Elam, Deborah Golder, Michael Tubbs, '12, MA '12, Kate Mayer, Christopher Vassos and Dustin Fink. Executive Producers: Brad Hayward, '92, John Stafford, MA '06 Director of Photography: Aaron Kehoe Producer: Julia James, '06, MA '11 Associate Producer: Kylie Gordon, '02 Aerial Cinematography: Romeo Durscher, Mark Johnson Cinematography: Aaron Kehoe, Ian Terpin Color: Kurt Hickman Edited by: Aaron Kehoe, Julia James Music: Full Moon Instrumental by Peter Bradley Adams


Видео добавлено: