Otis Johnson went to jail at the age of 25. When he got out at 69, he rejoined a world that was starkly different from the one he remembered. This is his story. Last year, we met Otis Johnson at a New York City shelter for ex-convicts. Everyone there was trying to get their feet back on the ground. Otis had just got out of prison after serving a 44-year sentence. The last time he had seen his family was May 1975. When we shared Otis's first story of being reintroduced to the modern world, viewers were amazed by just how unfamiliar everything was to him. iPhones, Times Square, jars of pre-mixed peanut butter and jelly. everything was new or starkly different. INTERACTIVE: My life after 44 years in prison. The story of Otis Johnson His story clearly resonated with people. More than 12 million people watched Otis' story on YouTube, and we wanted to show them what happened next. We went to Asbury Park, in New Jersey, with Otis to try to find them. Reconnecting with family was something he had said he was always interested in doing, but hadn't got round to yet. After all, he was still learning how to navigate the city. He had a small box where he kept old, tattered photos of family members, but that was basically all the information he had on them. The only address I really have is Asbury Park, Otis told us. So we took the train to Asbury Park not knowing much. But we did have Otis' memory. Once we arrived at the train station and began roaming the streets, small things about his old home slowly came back to him: extended family members, friends, shops. He wanted to find his aunt, Dottie Moore, and some other family members. He said many would probably think he was dead. When we talked to Otis about his relationship with his family, his answers were complicated. He was a member of the Fruit of Islam (the paramilitary wing of Nation of Islam, the Islamic religious movement once famously led by Malcom X) in his younger days. The Nation of Islam's stated goals were to improve the spiritual, mental, social, and economic condition of African Americans. Otis was a devout Muslim who said he helped clean up the streets of drug dealers. We wasn't all bad, he would say. But Otis said some of his family members didn't buy that. He didn't know if they would be angry or happy to see him after all these years away. He had a nervous energy about him as we walked down Pine Street, knocking on doors and asking strangers about Dottie Moore. This final story on Otis Johnson is one of reconnection and reconciliation. It is the story of a man on a quest to reunite with remnants of his past and one, we hope, many can relate to. Find out more about Otis: More AJ Shorts: -- Filmmakers: Elena Boffetta - Jenna Belhumeur - Executive Producer: Yasir Khan - Subscribe to our channel Follow us on Twitter Find us on Facebook Check our website:


Prince Harry's popcorn was swiped by toddler at the Invictus Games. Harry is the founder of the games: »»» Subscribe to CBC News to watch more videos: Connect with CBC News Online: For breaking news, video, audio and in-depth coverage: Find CBC News on Facebook: Follow CBC News on Twitter: For breaking news on Twitter: Follow CBC News on Instagram: Download the CBC News app for iOS: Download the CBC News app for Android: »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» For more than 75 years, CBC News has been the source Canadians turn to, to keep them informed about their communities, their country and their world. Through regional and national programming on multiple platforms, including CBC Television, CBC News Network, CBC Radio, CBCNews.ca, mobile and on-demand, CBC News and its internationally recognized team of award-winning journalists deliver the breaking stories, the issues, the analyses and the personalities that matter to Canadians.


Michael Rubino has 19 children and he's finally meeting them all for the first time. When he was in his 30s, Rubino became a sperm donor to help other families. Unlike many other donors, he decided that he didn't want to remain anonymous, and before he knew it, the children started contacting him. I loved them each immediately when I met them, he said. Inside Edition is now bringing them all together for the very first time.


How solar and lunar eclipses work. Note: This is an update of a video we published in 2015. Sources: Getty Images NASA: Eclipse catalog: Dmitry Chulkov: Bernt Rostad: mtsrs: CNES/CNRS/NASA: Marc Aragnou: Jesse Olson: redwing115: Xavier Jubier: vfr800hu: mikewattsuk/bbc: Subscribe to our channel! On August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse is coming to the continental United States for the first time in 38 years, which may make it the most viewed total solar eclipse in history. These events generate so much excitement because the orbital mechanics of the earth-moon-sun system keep the moon's shadow small and mobile. It will touch any given spot on the planet only once in over 300 years on average. For that reason, most people must make a concerted effort if they are to witness this event in their lifetimes. In this video we explain the differences between a solar and lunar eclipse and why some believe that a total eclipse of the sun is the greatest natural phenomenon of them all. If you're anywhere in the continental United States that day, you can preview exactly what the solar eclipse will look like for your particular zip code, and when it will peak. Check it out: Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


We've been putting our routers in the wrong place this whole time. Subscribe to our channel! Find many more wifi tips here: Wifi map courtesy of Jason Cole Wifi signals are made of radio waves that have a shorter wavelength than AM radio and cell phones but longer than satellite tv. How can I make my wifi faster? There are several things you can do to make your wifi faster without paying more, and they mostly have to do with the placement of your wifi router. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


There's a method to the madness of classifying roads. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: A street is a road but a road isn't always a street. A road can also be an avenue or a boulevard—it's the general term for anything that connects two points. From there, the names of roads can be shaped by their environment and/or the form of the road. A drive is a long winding road that can be shaped by mountains or a lake. Place is a narrow road with no throughway. And just as there is no rule book to building a city, these roads and other don't always correspond with their described classifications. Subscribe to our channel! Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


A boy with cerebral palsy was told he'd never walk, but did just that when he saw his returning Marine dad.


Odds are that you’ve been hearing more and more about cryptocurrency as digital tokens like bitcoin and ethereum have become valuable commodities. Converts (and investors) say that cryptocurrencies built on blockchain technology represent the future of money, finance, and commerce. But skeptics say that digital currencies represent crowd-sourced pyramid schemes or are fuel for another tech bubble. We met with Olaf Carlson-Wee, who was the first employee at the cryptocurrency broker Coinbase, where he famously took his entire salary in bitcoin. Now, Carlson-Wee runs a hedge fund that deals exclusively in crypto-assets. We talked with Carlson-Wee in San Francisco about money, trust, and how he made his friends rich. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


How the 1978 spinoff accidentally shaped the Star Wars universe. Subscribe to our channel! A long time ago in living rooms across the US, a bizarre 98-minute Star Wars-themed variety show aired on CBS to an estimated 13 million viewers. It wasn't necessarily the first of its kind: hosts like Donny & Marie Osmond and Richard Pryor had done TV variety shows with Star Wars characters in 1977, which had helped boost box office sales. But unlike those shows, the Holiday Special featured the original film's cast. George Lucas was convinced to approve the project in order to maintain interest in the franchise until The Empire Strikes Back's 1980 release — but the special itself is a confusing mess. A crossdressing Harvey Korman leads a cooking show segment, Jefferson Starship stars in a holographic concert, and Chewbacca's dad watches some very suggestive virtual reality entertainment. But if nothing else, the Holiday Special was one of the first examples of Star Wars' expanded universe — whose influence continues to shape the today's Star Wars stories. No spoilers for The Last Jedi, from a certain point of view. Watch more: Oscar Boyson on Star Wars influences: Lucasfilm's Story Group on the EU: EU history by Star Wars Explained: Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


This exclusive behind-the-scenes clip follows the SpaceX CEO and his team as they witness and celebrate the first launch of Falcon Heavy. ➡ Subscribe: About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: Facebook: Twitter: Instagram: Read Exclusive: Watch Elon Musk Freak Out Over the Falcon Heavy Launch. Learn more about the National Geographic Channel series MARS. Behind-the-Scenes: See How Elon Musk Celebrated the Falcon Heavy Launch | National Geographic National Geographic


Mirai Nagasu, 24, did not make the 2014 Sochi Olympics team.


It's a frustrating crime that's happening more often than ever as packages are being snatched off porches, and most of the culprits are getting away scot-free. Inside Edition attempted to catch a porch pirate in the act by leaving bait boxes outside several different homes. What the thieves don't know is that a GPS tracking device was placed inside each box with a $250 speaker. The electronics were placed inside the box, sealed up and left on the front porches of three homes in Clifton, N.J.


Harvard University has called 2016 graduate Donovan Livingston's spoken-verse commencement speech one of the most powerful, heartfelt student speeches you will ever hear!


A woman believed to have left her newborn baby in an Arizona airport bathroom didn’t realize she was pregnant, according to a note she left with the infant. An Avis employee called 911, saying, “Somebody left a newborn baby with a note in the bathroom.” The hours-old baby boy was wrapped in a jacket and lying on a changing table in a women’s restroom when he was discovered in Tucson International Airport in January, Tucson Airport Authority Police said.


How two feuding countries are tearing apart the Middle East. Subscribe to our channel! The Saudis and Iranians have never actually declared war on each other. Instead, they fight indirectly by supporting opposing sides in other countries and inciting conflicts. This is known as proxy warfare. And it’s had a devastating effect on the region. Countries, especially poor ones, can’t function if there are larger countries pulling strings within their borders. And that’s exactly what's happening in the Middle East. The Saudi-Iranian rivalry has become a fight over influence, and the whole region is a battlefield. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


American snowboarder Red Gerard speaks to the media after clinching gold in slopestyle.


If you work in an office, there's a good chance it's an open one. How did we get here? And why is it so bad? Find the Overrated Facebook page here: Find Phil Edwards on Facebook here: Subscribe to our channel! Open offices have been around a surprisingly long time. But they're relatively misunderstood for their role in workplace culture. Where did open offices and cubicles come from, and are they really what we want? This episode of Overrated explores the history, including Frank Lloyd Wright, Herman Miller, and other key figures in the office design movement. Our workplaces haven't always been this way — this is how we got here. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


More from Inside Edition: Steep seats are becoming more and more common at arenas across America. They're designed so that spectators in the upper decks are closer to the action with unblocked sightlines, but are they dangerous? Paul McCartney opened to a sellout crowd at Sacramento’s new Golden 1 Center last year. A concert-goer was wheeled out of the arena on opening night after he says a fan fell on top of him. “It just felt very unsafe walking up there,” he said. He's not alone.


Jordan Peterson sits down with the CBC’s Wendy Mesley to talk about political polarization, Pepe the Frog and his support from the far right. He has a new book called 12 Rules for Life: an Antidote to Chaos. Peterson sparked controversy in 2016, when he spoke against a federal bill on gender expression and the University of Toronto’s policy requirement to address students by their gender pronoun of choice. »»» Subscribe to CBC News to watch more videos: Connect with CBC News Online: For breaking news, video, audio and in-depth coverage: Find CBC News on Facebook: Follow CBC News on Twitter: For breaking news on Twitter: Follow CBC News on Instagram: Download the CBC News app for iOS: Download the CBC News app for Android: »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» For more than 75 years, CBC News has been the source Canadians turn to, to keep them informed about their communities, their country and their world. Through regional and national programming on multiple platforms, including CBC Television, CBC News Network, CBC Radio, CBCNews.ca, mobile and on-demand, CBC News and its internationally recognized team of award-winning journalists deliver the breaking stories, the issues, the analyses and the personalities that matter to Canadians.


Jenny Jones was one of many daytime talk show hosts in the 90's that had viewers tuning in to watch ordinary people reveal their deepest secrets, but one revelation would turn deadly. In 1995, 'The Jenny Jones Show' taped an episode on secret admirers. 32-year-old Scott Amedure revealed he had a crush on, 24-year-old Jonathan Schmitz. Three days later one man would be dead and the other charged with murder. InsideEdition.com's Mara Montalbano () has more.


Over the past 20 years, Franco Loja and Arjan Roskam, known as the Kings of Cannabis, have made millions of dollars scouring the world for unique strains of weed to breed and then sell. Now, they've turned their sights on Equatorial Africa, specifically the Democratic Republic of the Congo, as their next gold mine — and a way to revolutionize the cannabis industry. Equatorial Africa is one the best preserved because of the wars, the lack of infrastructure, political unrest. All these situations created isolation there, Loja explained. So that's where we're going. Loja and Roskam built their global powerhouse on inbred strains of cannabis called landraces that they've collected from all over the world — Argentina, Australia, and Brazil, just to name a few spots. Without these strains, the duo's various breeding enterprises, Amsterdam coffeeshops, and even distribution centers wouldn't exist. VICE News met up with the “Kings of Cannabis” for a trip to the Democratic Republic of the Congo to hunt for one of the rarest species of Cannabis yet, the original Congolese landrace. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Senior Actor Jeeva talks exclusively to ABN Telugu in Open Heart with RK interview show with ABN MD Radha Krishna. Jeeva has revealed about his career details, his attitude and added that he is not interested in giving interviews. Jeeva further shared his association with director Ram Gopal Varma and his films namely Satya, Ab Tak Chhappan, and Sarkar. For more latest and breaking news subscribe @ Follow us @ , , Watch ABN Andhrajyothy, the no 1 Telugu news channel, a 24/7 LIVE news channel dedicated to live reports, exclusive interviews, breaking news, sports, weather, entertainment, business updates and current affairs.


You don’t have to go vegan to fight climate change. Research shows that small changes to our diets can make big differences. Climate Lab is produced by the University of California in partnership with Vox. Hosted by conservation scientist Dr. M. Sanjayan, the videos explore the surprising elements of our lives that contribute to climate change and the groundbreaking work being done to fight back. Featuring conversations with experts, scientists, thought leaders and activists, the series demystifies topics like nuclear power, food waste and online shopping to make them more approachable and actionable for those who want to do their part. Sanjayan is an alum of UC Santa Cruz, a Visiting Researcher at UCLA and the CEO of Conservation International. Prior episodes at or visit for more Subscribe to our channel! And check out the University of California’s channels: The University of California is a pioneer on climate research, renewable energy and environmental sustainability. UC is dedicated to providing scalable solutions to help the world bend the curve on climate change. UC research is also paving the way for the university to meet its goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2025. Read more about our commitment at Follow UC on Facebook: Or on Twitter: Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out Vox’s full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


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Granite countertops are an American obsession. But how did they become so ubiquitous? Our nation's countertop history has had a few surprising twists and turns. This is the final episode in the first season of Overrated - you can learn more about it here: Follow Phil Edwards on Facebook here: You can read the Vox article here: Granite countertops are beautiful, but aren't they a little overrated? In the past, Americans loved their formica and laminate countertops, so what changed the kitchen landscape? It turns out that stone imports from countries like Brazil and Italy, improved means of importing and cutting granite, and a general decrease in cost made the once-elite material accessible to the HGTV-loving masses. The history of granite countertops isn't just about shiny counters, but about international trade, technology, and how trends trickle down from elites to the masses. Is granite here to stay? Who knows — quartz may prove to be formidable competition. But now at least you won't take it for granted (yes, we knowingly passed up the opportunity to write take it for granite — classy, right?). Subscribe to our channel! Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


The mayor and city manager in Rohnert Park, California, say they are investigating an incident where an unidentified officer drew his gun on a man recording him.


Butterfly may be Arizona's only geep, that's how rare she is. What exactly is a geep you might be asking? You might not believe us if we told you.


Mountain climber Alex Honnold seems to defy gravity, scaling sheer, steep rock faces with no rope and apparently no fear. Lara Logan reports. Watch more HERE: Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE!


Chloe Kim was an emerging force in snowboarding when she qualified for the 2014 Olympics at age 13, and she continues to win. Watch our series: More from The New York Times Video: Subscribe: Watch all of our videos here: Facebook: Twitter: ---------- Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch.


Magician Rich Ferguson surprises unsuspecting passersby with his unique sneezes. See more at richferguson.com. Go to for more videos like this. For more CNN videos, check out our YouTube channel at


The founding fathers loved the pawpaw fruit, so how come almost nobody today has heard of them? Subscribe to our channel! Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook: Make sure to check out Andrew's book about the pawpaw: Special thanks to Mike Tschappat for permission to use his photograph in the video.


Check out VICE News for more: WATCH Fighter jet action: We rode shotgun in an F-16 with the Air Force’s elite stunt pilots MINNEAPOLIS — There are few things as “USA, USA” as the jets screaming overhead at the start of the Super Bowl. But making that happen at exactly the climax of the national anthem is a pretty complex logistical challenge, particularly when the formation has three generations of air power flying together: an F-16, an A-10, and a World War II-era P-51. I wanted to find out how this works first hand, so we headed to Minneapolis and linked up with the Air Force team getting ready to do the flyover of Super Bowl LII from Minneapolis-St. Paul Air Reserve Station. It turns out the toughest part of the stadium flyover is the timing. My pilot, Maj. John “Rain” Waters, explained how the process works. Basically, the jets take off early and circle a 12 mile radius around the stadium. The team knows how long it will take to fly to the stadium, and the team inside the stadium Super Bowl knows how long it will take Pink to sing the national anthem. The trick is to start the approach so you’re flying over just as the singer is belting out “home of the brave.” Lt. Col. Chris Nike McAlear was the Air Force lead inside U.S. Bank Stadium, where the Super Bowl was held. His job was to keep the pilots aware of any schedule changes inside the stadium to make sure they can adjust in time. It turns out the flyovers have a real military training purpose. Close air support missions require perfect timing on the battlefield, otherwise you might bomb the wrong troops. Stadium flyovers offer the opportunity for pilots to train how to be at a given place at an exact time, a situation that is hard to simulate outside combat conditions. “What this does is forces our pilots to go up there and recalculate speeds and routes, Waters said. The Air Force wasn’t able to tell me the exact cost of the flyover, but they did explain that flyovers are typically at no additional cost to the taxpayer (other outlets have estimated the cost of previous flyovers at $450,000) as the funds for the flights come from training budgets. Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


VICE founder Suroosh Alvi recently traveled to Gunpo, South Korea, to try out the Method 2 prototype, a hulking manned robot made by Hankook Mirae Technology. Weighing in at over one and a half tons, and standing 13 feet tall, the Method 2 looks like something out of science fiction. Specifically, this exoskeleton robot looks like something you’ve seen in a movie, and that’s by design: Hankook Mirae Chairman Yang Jin-Ho and his team collaborated with a Hollywood designer to make the Method-2. Jin-Ho spent $200 million of his own money on the project, and claims his creation is the world’s first manned bipedal robot. The robot is designed to mimic hand and arm movements, and is suspended by two metal cabals in the ceiling to keep it balanced. So far the Method-2 is only used for fun, but its creator envisions it will play a critical role in future crises. “It’s more likely it’ll be used in fires and disaster relief situations,” Jin-Ho said. “But also find application in military operations.” Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Permafrost refers to frozen soil and water that covers nearly a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere. With climate change warming the Arctic at an alarming rate, the permafrost is beginning to thaw. While this phenomenon can wreak havoc on infrastructure and transportation in places like Northern Alaska and Siberia, the real danger is the release of carbon and methane gas. There are more greenhouse gases trapped in these deep layers of permafrost than all human fossil fuel emissions released since the industrial age. Due to permafrost thaw, that trapped carbon is starting to escape into the atmosphere, creating a warming feedback loop that will make climate change even worse, and cause the permafrost to thaw even faster. If this continues unchecked, scientists warn we could be on the verge of awakening the sleeping giant of climate change. But some innovative climate pioneers are changing that. With the use of both cutting edge genetics, and an experiment that relies on geo-engineering, there is hope that the permafrost thaw can be slowed. VICE Correspondent, Ben Anderson, travels across the Arctic to see the devastating impact of thawing permafrost, and the astonishing solution that might keep it frozen. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Dark matter and dark energy comprise the vast majority of our universe, but it is the biggest mystery in modern physics to figure out what they actually are. The five percent of matter we can perceive abides by the laws of physics as we understand them. But when scientists applied the laws of gravity to how fast nearby galaxies are rotation, the math didn't add up. The other 95% of our universe is known only as dark matter and dark energy and scientists around the world are scrambling to understand what these two forces are. ​ Who knows what discoveries and impacts on our lives will come said Dr. Bruno Leibundgut, an astronomer at the European Southern Observatory, where he and his team are utilizing the most powerful telescope on Earth to figure out just how much the universe's expansion is accelerating.​ And in an abandoned gold mine a mile beneath the Black Hills of South Dakota, scientists are using a massive tank of supercooled liquid xenon as they wait for photosensors to measure an elusive dark matter particle.​​ Nuclear physicist and VICE correspondent Taylor Wilson went to meet the scientists working to solve the greatest mystery of the universe. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


The value of Bitcoin has risen this year from just under one thousand dollars to $7,700 on Wednesday — a jump of nearly 700%. Those are absurd returns, but the underlying technology of cryptocurrencies could make an even bigger impact. It's called blockchain, and it could revolutionize global industries — and even pose a threat to governments. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Helen Mirren's new horror movie ‘Winchester’ tells the frightening story of the most haunted house in America. The 160-room behemoth is filled with a labyrinth of hallways, doors and a stairway that leads to nowhere. Legend has it that heiress Sarah Winchester ordered the never-ending construction project to imprison vengeful ghosts who had died from Winchester rifles. Inside Edition went inside the real-life Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, California.


Canada is a meme. Facebook @ FOLLOW Paul Joseph Watson @


President Obama and the First Lady hosted the Broadway cast of the musical “Hamilton” at the White House Monday for a workshop and Q&A session with area students. President Obama delivered remarks on the history behind Hamilton, and the cast performed “Alexander Hamilton, the opening song of the play, live for the attendees.


More from Inside Edition: Golf carts aren't just for golfing anymore and appear to be everywhere, but driving them off the links comes with potentially serious hazards. The vehicles may look sturdy fun, but they can be perilous if you're not careful. In startling videos, some knuckleheads can be seen using them to smash into their buddies. The reckless stunts have gone viral and are being called the “hottest prank in sports.” Golf carts can be dangerous even 30 miles per hour.


Feminist fight club. ORIGINAL VIDEO: Facebook @ FOLLOW Paul Joseph Watson @


Why North Korea has children’s schools in Japan Follow Johnny to stay up to date on Vox Borders: Instagram: Facebook: My dispatch about Japan's rising right-wing nationalism: Original Music by Rare Henderson: Vox Borders Episodes: 1. Haiti and the Dominican Republic ( ) 2. The Arctic & Russia () 3. Japan & North Korea () 4. Mexico & Guatemala () 5. Nepal & The Himalaya () 6. Spain & Morocco () For this episode I found myself embeded with a small community in Japan. They were born there, they speak the language. But they're not Japanese citizens, or even ethnically Japanese - they're North Korean. There's about 150,000 of them living in Japan today, and they've been there for over a century. This community has close ties with the regime in Pyongyang, which supports them financially (and vice-versa). But more importantly, Pyongyang offers them an identity, a heritage, and cultural legitimacy - things that some elements of Japanese society work to deny them. Vox Borders Episodes: 1. Haiti and the Dominican Republic ( ) 2. The Arctic & Russia () 3. Japan & North Korea ()


College football programs are already meeting with young football players, like 11-year-old Bunchie Young.


British weatherman Liam Dutton pronounced the 58-letter name of Welsh village Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch flawlessly.


The woman was rushed to the hospital after a ball hit her in the face during a game between the Tampa Bay Rays and Chicago White Sox.


What would happen if the president of the United States wanted to launch a nuclear weapon? Here are the steps the commander-in-chief would need to take. ---------- Like this video? Subscribe to Bloomberg on YouTube: Bloomberg is the First Word in business news, delivering breaking news & analysis, up-to-the-minute market data, features, profiles and more: Connect with us on. Twitter: Facebook: Instagram:


More from Inside Edition: While some people are lucky enough to win big at casinos, the hardest part can sometimes be collecting the winnings. Inside Edition’s investigative team has found people who thought they'd be taking home huge earnings, only to discover that wasn't the case. Katrina Bookman, 44, hit a $42.9 million jackpot at Resorts World Casino in Queens, N.Y. She posed next to the winning machine as it displayed her earnings. As a crowd started gathering around, security showed up.


Workout influencer Cassey Ho of the YouTube channel Blogilates joins Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb with some challenging and fun workouts! Cassey Ho started her YouTube channel after she moved cities as a way to keep her students up to date with fresh exercises » Subscribe to TODAY: » Watch the latest from TODAY: About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: Find TODAY on Facebook: Follow TODAY on Twitter: Follow TODAY on Google+: Follow TODAY on Instagram: Follow TODAY on Pinterest: YouTube Star Cassey Ho Shows Off Her “Blogilates” Workouts | TODAY


Donald Trump has been called A Dangerously Isolated President. However, according to Trump's own account, he has a diverse friend group spanning people of different race, religion, gender, occupation, and athletic ability. We have provided a shortlist of examples of the varying friends that make up the President's circle. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


A couple vacationing in Mexico encountered a number of killer whales swimming alongside their boat during a trip.


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